7 comments on “Ch. 14 Discussion

  1. pg. 201 “He crossed upon the stone bridge and looked down into the swollen waters and raised the dogs and pitched them in.”
    – What kid of person can buy two puppies and then just want to throw them into the river?
    – this just shows how crazy the judge is.

    “Whatever in creation exists without my knowledge exists without my consent” pg 207
    – this is a quote by the judge again
    – he actually believes that he is a type of God

    A popular symbol is rain representing rebirth, at the beginning of chapter 14 we see that they are in a storm for many days? What do you think this symbolizes? What could mean for the kid?

    • Page 200: “Glanton in his drunkenness was taken with a kind of fit and he lurched crazed and disheveled into the little courtyard and began to open fire with his pistols. In the afternoon he lay bound to his bed like a madman while the judge sat with him and cooled his brow with rags of water and spoke to him in a low voice.”
      • The judge fills many different motifs in the book and here he seems to take on a nurturing role, is this just part of his role as a leader or does it help lend to the judge’s mystery because we do not quite know why the judge would care if Glanton had gone crazy?
      • What was the judge speaking to Glanton about? What the judge says could range hugely given how the character has been portrayed.

      Page 205 (upon discovering a man missing): “The judge turned loose Carroll’s horse and went to get his own animal. Two of the Delawares detached themselves from the company.”
      • The lost man was black, and they still went back to get him. This could be an example of McCarthy’s commentary on the lack of superficial racism in the West when just surviving was hard enough.
      • There is no questioning amongst the men, they simply accept what the part is doing and go along with it.

      There is a strange camaraderie amongst the group of savage men shown in both quotes, have the men started to form some kind of strange bond? What I am most interested to see is if the narrator will grow some kind of emotional attachment to the group, unlike his removed nature towards everything else so far.

  2. Page 200: “By noon Glanton in his drunkenness was taken with a kind of fit and he lurched crazed and disheveled into the little courtyard and began to open fire with his pistols. In the afternoon he lay bound to his bed like a madman while the judge sat with him and cooled his brow with rags of water and spoke to him in a low voice.”
    • The judge fills many different motifs in the book and here he seems to take on a nurturing role, is this just part of his role as a leader or does it help lend to the judge’s mystery because we do not quite know why the judge would care if Glanton had gone crazy?
    • What was the judge speaking to Glanton about? What the judge says could range hugely given how the character has been portrayed.

    Page 205 (upon discovering a man was missing): “Two of the Delawares detached themselves from the company. When they rode out up the trail it was almost dark and the company had pulled back into the woods and posted videttes at the ford and they made no fire.”
    • The lost man was black, and they still went back to get him. This could be an example of McCarthy’s commentary on the lack of superficial racism in the West when just surviving was hard enough.
    • There is no questioning amongst the men, they simply accept what the part is doing and go along with it.

    Both quotes show a strange camaraderie in the party of savage men, is the group bonding together? More importantly, will the narrator have an emotional attachment to the group at some point, instead of being detached like in the rest of the book?

    • In my opinion, the Judge seems to be the one who is intent on keeping the group together, I think he wants this because of the groups tendency towards violence, which he enjoys. I think the other members of the gang are more intent on sticking together because they are being tracked down by the Mexican government and know that in a group they have a better chance of surviving.

  3. Earlier on the judge is seen caring for Glanton, but later one he is seen tossing in puppies into the river.

    Is the judge only kind to the evil?

    • I think that the judge really just does what he wants. From reading this chapter I get the feeling that he has a God complex from everyone listening to what he says and his conversation with Toadvine.

    • I agree with Leron. It does seem like the judge does whatever he wants. He leaves a trail of destruction behind him wherever he goes. Even when it seems like the judge is turning around and looks like he is becoming a better person but he always goes back to being evil.

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